wine history tours logo
Search
Book Now

Wine in Different Languages

Domaine Divio women enjoying late day sun

Wine has been a beloved beverage for thousands of years and has been called by many different names throughout history. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at the various terms for wine in different languages and where these terms come from.

  1. Latin – Vinum

The word “vinum” is the Latin word for wine. The ancient Romans were renowned for their love of wine, and the word “vinum” was used to describe any fermented grape juice. Interestingly, the word “vinegar” comes from the Latin word “vinum acre” which means “sour wine.”

Indulge in the Rich History and Flavors of Vinum - the Latin Word for Wine.
Indulge in the Rich History and Flavors of Vinum – the Latin Word for Wine.
  1. Greek – Oinos

The ancient Greeks also loved their wine, and they called it “oinos.” In Greek mythology, wine was often associated with the god Dionysus, who was the god of wine, fertility, and theater. The Greeks believed that wine had the power to bring people closer together and to inspire creativity.

  1. French – Vin

The French word for wine is “vin,” which comes from the Latin word “vinum.” France is known for its many famous wine regions, including Bordeaux, Burgundy, and Champagne. Many of these French wine regions have been producing wine for thousands of years. French wine is often associated with elegance, sophistication, and refinement.

  1. Italian – Vino

The Italian word for wine is “vino,” which is also derived from the Latin word “vinum.” Italy is known for its many wine regions, including Tuscany, Piedmont, and Veneto. Italian wine is often associated with food and often makes great food pairings. 

  1. Spanish – Vino

The Spanish word for wine is also “vino,” which, like Italian, comes from the Latin word “vinum.” Spain is known for its many wine regions, including Rioja, Ribera del Duero, and Priorat. Spanish wine is often associated with bold, rich flavors.

  1. German – Wein

The German word for wine is “wein,” which is derived from the Old High German word “wīn.” Germany is known for its Rieslings and other white wines, and is often associated with sweetness and acidity.

  1. Portuguese – Vinho

The Portuguese word for wine is “vinho,” which is also derived from the Latin word “vinum.” Portugal is best known for Port, a sweet, fortified wine that is often enjoyed as a dessert wine.

Portuguese term of wine "vinho"
Savor the Taste of Vinho – the Portuguese Word for Wine. Experience the Richness of Tradition and the Sweetness of Portugal’s Finest.
  1. Hungarian – Bor

The Hungarian word for wine is “bor,” which is a unique word that is not derived from Latin. Hungary is known for its Tokaji wines, which are sweet wines made from grapes affected by noble rot.

Wine has been called by many different names throughout history and depending on region, but its popularity has remained constant. Whether you’re drinking “vinum” in Latin or “vino” in Italian, wine has the power to bring people together, inspire creativity, and make any meal more enjoyable.

Want to read more? Try these books!

The Sommelier's Atlas of Taste- A Field Guide to the Great Wines of Europe The Widow Clicquot- The Story of a Champagne Empire and the Woman Who Ruled It (P.S.)

References:

https://www.facebook.com/SocialVignerons. 2015. “How to Say Wine in 8 of the Most Spoken Languages.” Social Vignerons. August 15, 2015. https://socialvignerons.com/2015/08/15/how-to-say-wine-in-8-of-the-most-spoken-languages/.

Book Now

Share:

Hot Topics

Get The Latest Updates

Subscribe To Our Weekly Newsletter

No spam, notifications only about new products, updates.
On Trend

Most Popular Stories

Dick Erath's wine

Dick Erath: An Oregon Legend

Willamette Valley’s Dick Erath Dick Erath’s contributions to the Oregon wine industry were numerous and profound. In the 1960s, he was  actually working in the